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Author Topic: Dominion terms  (Read 429 times)

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BryGuy

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Dominion terms
« on: May 03, 2023, 09:51:27 pm »
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I'm learning German. I find it interesting how "Koffer" means suitcase and how many English words are translated into German by changing the "c" to a "k". An example: (English) camera = Kamera (German)

Holger

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Re: Dominion terms
« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2023, 04:33:30 am »
+1

I'm learning German. I find it interesting how "Koffer" means suitcase and how many English words are translated into German by changing the "c" to a "k". An example: (English) camera = Kamera (German)

Yes, German does not use the C as a single character, it only appears in the combinations CH, SCH and CK (with a few edge cases in words of foreign origin like Café or Cello). I suppose that in most words of Latin origin, the C was changed to K when the German language developed. Or maybe historical English changed K to C in German-origin words, like "können" -> "can"...
It's quite annoying in German Scrabble when you draw a C without an H or K.  ;)

Good luck with your learning!  :D German is supposed to be a rather complicated foreign language to learn, as far as I've heard.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2023, 04:36:09 am by Holger »
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AJD

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Re: Dominion terms
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2023, 11:05:33 am »
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In early stages of English, only c was used, even in native Germanic-origin words: consider Old English cynd (modern kind), cyning (king), cepan (keep). The letter k was introduced to English writing in the Middle English period, i.e., after the 11th century.

Old High German, on the other hand, seems to have used both k and c interchangeably, before standardizing on k in the modern period.

(Disclaimer: I am a linguist, but this isn't my area of expertise; I don't know much detail about the history of writing systems in the Germanic languages and I could be mistaken here.)
« Last Edit: May 06, 2023, 12:51:02 am by AJD »
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J Reggie

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Re: Dominion terms
« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2023, 03:05:16 pm »
+1

When I was studying German, I was telling a friend about how c is much less common in German than in English, and he said that's why Americans say "from c to shining c"
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