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1
Puzzles and Challenges / RNG vs decisions
« on: October 24, 2018, 10:59:00 am »
2-player Dominion, one player gets to make all decisions for both players and the other gets to choose how each deck is shuffled. Obviously in most kingdoms, the decision player can just have the RNG player buy out all the Curses and never buy anything else and then it just becomes a matter of time until the decision player can force good enough draws to win the game, but this might not be the case in every game.

1) Can you think of a kingdom where the RNG player can force a stalemate?
2) Can you think of a kingdom where the RNG player can force a win?

2
Mafia Game Threads / Mafia Finnish championship (we're invited)
« on: August 25, 2018, 12:49:44 pm »
I got invited to the Finnish Mafia championship to represent f.ds. We're allowed to send up to 3 Finnish people. I suppose it's fine with everyone if I agree? Also it'd be great if Eevee participated too, and I don't think we have a third Finn but correct me if I'm wrong. I'll post further details later, on a phone atm.

3
Dominion: Renaissance Previews / Dominion: Renaissance on RGG's website
« on: August 04, 2018, 05:29:38 pm »
http://riograndegames.com/Game/1334-Dominion-Renaissance

It's a momentous time. Art has been revolutionized by the invention of "perspective," and also of "funding." A picture used to be worth a dozen or so words; these new ones are more like a hundred. Oil paintings have gotten so realistic that you've hired an artist to do a portrait of you each morning, so you can make sure your hair is good. Busts have gotten better too; no more stopping at the shoulders, they go all the way to the ground. Science and medicine have advanced; there's no more superstition, now they know the perfect number of leeches to apply for each ailment. You have a clock accurate to within an hour, and a calendar accurate to within a week. Your physician heals himself, and your barber cuts his own hair. This is truly a golden age.


This is the 12th expansion to Dominion. It has 300 cards, with 25 new Kingdom cards. There are tokens that let you save coins and actions for later, Projects that grant abilities, and Artifacts to fight over.

4
So I haven't played any ladder in almost three months and I just finished my matches for this season in the League and decided not to return for the next season. Here are some reasons why, in order from most to least important:

1) Prismata doesn't have any of the following problems and it's just a really good game in general so I'd rather spend my time playing Prismata.
2) My opponent can take a really long time to think while I have nothing to do. Slowrolling on purpose is a rare problem, but people who just take a long time to think are pretty common and just as frustrating to play against.
3) There's no deck tracker. This means I have to choose between spending a long time digging the log for information all the time and making uninformed decisions all the time.
4) Shuffle iT's implementation is sometimes very slow, which is probably at least partially because it's a browser client, not a standalone.
5) There are many reasons why the game can be a serious uphill battle for one player for reasons nobody had any control over. The most notable reason is first player advantage, but games where that happens because of shuffle luck are also common enough that they actually happen. While alternating the starting player can make it a fair match in a tournament or the League, that doesn't make it any more enjoyable to play the games where a player can only really lose if they make an enormous mistake.
6) If I play ladder actively, I mostly have to get matched against people who are significantly worse than me. This might not be true at the moment, but it was when I stopped playing ladder three months ago, hoping that the other problems wouldn't bother me so much in the more competitive and more evenly matched League setting (but as it turns out, they still did).
7) Donald X. has been talking about each new expansion being diminishing returns because you only get to see the new cards so often when there are 300 other cards in the pool, and with the release of Nocturne, I think we finally passed some kind of a threshold for me where I feel like it actually didn't really contribute very much towards making the overall game more interesting. I still have a lot of Nocturne cards that I suck at playing, and I think that's mostly just because a lot of kingdoms just have the same old cards that I can already wrap my head around and the Nocturne stuff doesn't show up all that much. This is not really even a problem per say, but some kind of a standardized format (that you could automatch for) that leaves out some of the older expansions certainly wouldn't hurt.

Honestly if Stef gets his ShiT together and does something about points 2, 3, and 4, that will probably be enough for me to get back into playing Dominion actively, but aside from that, I'll probably only play in the big tournaments and whenever there's a new expansion just to check it out.

5
Dominion General Discussion / Alchemy card revelation...
« on: May 20, 2018, 06:48:07 pm »



6
I think everyone has an intuitive understanding of what makes a card strong, but it's much more difficult to put it in a formula. Here are some ways to determine card strength and reasons why they don't work:

1. How often (top?) players gain the card
This doesn't take into account a scenario in which nobody gains the card, but it makes an impact by merely being present in the kingdom (e.g. Salt the Earth). It also doesn't take into account a scenario in which a card is only very slightly weaker than many other similar cards (e.g. Walled Village), in which case the card in question is not gained in many kingdoms because a slightly stronger card is gained instead. It also can't tell the difference between a low-impact card that you buy almost every time because it has a low opportunity cost (e.g. Pearl Diver) and a card that you buy almost every time because it has a huge impact (e.g. Goons).

2. How often do (top?) players win with the card vs. without the card
When a card is very strong, top players might have a very high win rate without the card because the weaker opponent will buy the card every time, whereas the top player is better able to consider the rare situation in which the card is not worth buying. The reverse is true for very weak cards. On the other hand, if we consider the entire player base instead of just top players, strong cards that don't have a high skill requirement (e.g. Rebuild) will appear higher while strong cards that do have a high skill requirement (e.g. Bridge) will appear lower. Much like 1), this does not take into account cards that can make an impact by being present even if nobody buys them.

3. If two top players of similar strength play a match where they are and aren't allowed to gain a card, respectively, how big of an advantage will the former have
This addresses all of the previous problems, but introduces a new one: the player who is allowed to buy the card has access to the knowledge that the other player will surely not buy it, which gives them an inherent advantage, partially independently of the card's strength. This also makes self-synergistic cards seem stronger than they really are. In the case of a real match between two real players, as opposed to a thought experiment, it also has the problems that six games is a very low sample size which can result in kingdoms or shuffles favoring one player over the other, and the players might not be giving their best performance at the time of the match even if they are very closely ranked.

Personally, I think that given how difficult it is to objectively measure a card's strength, it might be more important to talk about when to buy the card, and when to consider the card for your kingdom analysis as separate things. How big of an impact it makes in both cases is not so important. For example, Pearl Diver isn't really a very "strong" card, but you can buy it whenever there's nothing better to do, and due to its low cost and spammability, it can make pileout endings easier which is something that you should consider during kingdom analysis. It doesn't make a very big impact in either case, but you're not going to have the thought process "oh Pearl Diver only helps me a tiny little bit here, I guess I'm not going to buy it".

What do you think? Are there any other ways of measuring card strength that actually work?

7
Forum Games / Invitation to Mafia Championships Season 5
« on: April 17, 2018, 04:01:47 am »
Hi! Thingyman asked me to share this on his behalf:


INVITATION TO THE MAFIA CHAMPIONSHIP (SEASON 5)

Hello there! :)

It is with great pleasure that I hereby invite your community to take part in Season 5 of the Mafia Championship.

The Mafia Championship is an annual forum tournament series that pits representatives from various online Mafia (aka Werewolf) communities against one another as they compete to determine the Internetís greatest forum Mafia player. Each participating community democratically elects one person to represent them and be their ďChampionĒ.

The whole thing started back in 2013, and since then more than 225 different communities and 50+ different nationalities have been represented.

I hope it sounds like a fun and exciting event :)

1. DO YOU ACCEPT THE INVITE?

If your community wishes to participate, please confirm your participation to me as soon as you can to ensure yourselves a spot.

If you agree to participate, the deadline for selecting your representative is May 1. If this is too soon for you to decide on anyone, let me know and we can work something out.

The games will take place on Mafia Universe. If itís okay, I can link directly to the general discussion thread regarding this topic on Mafia Universe.

Important notes
  • You may decide yourselves how you want to elect your representative, but we highly recommend some sort of democratic process (public nominations followed by a poll usually works out well).
  • In addition to electing a representative, you should also name an alternate who will be asked to step in if the first choice needs to back out.
  • Your representative should be prepared for having to read upwards of 500 posts per 24 hours during the early stages of the game. Additionally, thereís a requirement that each player must make at least 10 posts per Game Day. Only active players should apply/participate. I repeat: Your chosen player needs to be able to promise a good amount of activity on a daily basis.
2. SEASON 5 FORMAT

The tournament structure
  • 170 communities will participate, each sending one representative.
  • 10 Qualifying Games will be played, consisting of 17 players each. I.e. every representative plays in one Qualifying Game. The players themselves vote post-game to determine who is deserving of advancement. 1st place will advance directly to the Finale Game (i.e. 10 of the 17 finalists are found this way), while the 2nd places will advance directly to one of the two Wildcard Games.
  • A Jury consisting of finalists from Season 4 will discuss and vote to determine 25 players in total deserving of a second chance: 1 will advance directly to the finale, and the 24 other players will play in 2 Wildcard Games along with the 2nd places that advanced directly to these. From each game, three players will directly advance to the Finale Game based on a post-game player vote.
  • The Finale Game is played. Once it has completed, the players vote to determine who shall receive the title of Season 5 Champion and a winnerís certificate signed by Dmitry Davidoff, the creator of mafia.
The setup explained very briefly (more details on host site)
This (view picture below) is a semi-open grid setup meant for 17 players: 4 mafia versus 13 townies. First you randomly select a number to decide the mafia team's composition of Power Roles (1-2), then you randomly select a letter to decide the town's composition of Power Roles (A-E). Fill in the number of Vanilla Townies needed to make the town team have 13 members total, and you have your setup.



*Town Jack of All Trades: 1x Vigilante, 1x Roleblocker, 1x Tracker.

Relevant mechanics info
  • Day start.
  • Deadline Lynch w/ Option for Majority starting Day 2. I.e. when day timer runs out, person with most votes will be lynched. However, day can also be ended early (starting Day 2) if there is ever a majority of votes on one person.
  • If there is a tied lynch, one of the tied players will be randomly lynched.
  • No outside communication. I.e. you may not contact the other players outside of the thread (unless you are Mafia and wish to speak with your teammates).
  • Phase Lengths and Deadlines will be up to the players themselves (Iíll organize them into games with deadlines that suit their preferences).
  • Thread is locked during Night Phases.
3. SEASON 5 TIMELINE

There will be 10 Qualifying Games, and your representative plays in just one of these. They will have start dates during the months of May and June. So in other words, as long as your representative can play sometime during that period, they should be good and Iíll make sure they get scheduled into a game that suits their schedule well. I.e. if your rep is busy until June, that isnít a problem.

Wildcard games will be played in July, and the Finale Game sometime in August/September (whenever we can work out something that suits everyone).

Kind regards,
Thingyman

If you want to get in contact with me ASAP, you can find me on Discord (Thingyman#6075).

8
Dominion Articles / How to be good at Dominion
« on: March 24, 2018, 05:31:14 pm »
Always keep in mind that winning is more important than having fun, and learning is more important than winning (unless itís an important tournament match, in which case winning takes precedence). If you have an ambitious goal that you want to reach, such as being good at Dominion, you canít expect to get there by fooling around forever, and you certainly canít expect to get there by doing the things you already know how to do forever. If you want to get there, you need to be prepared to work hard, and you need to be prepared to fail.

In other words, whenever youíre just playing Dominion on the ladder or even unranked games, donít pick the most fun strategy or the strategy that gives you the best odds of winning, pick the strategy that makes you feel the most uncomfortable. If you canít do that, you might have to face the harsh reality that you wonít have great hopes of getting good at Dominion.

9
Variants and Fan Cards / Addressing the first player advantage
« on: March 14, 2018, 03:03:36 pm »
I don't think a VP based handicap is great, because a number of VP which is hardly significant on one board could be a really big deal on another board, and a bidding based system can result in ridiculous games where it's a Province megaturn game and getting down the optimal bid is suddenly like half of the skill element in the game.

I have two different suggestion for making the game more balanced:

1) A coin token based handicap. Coins always have pretty much the same value, so if you can find the perfect number of coin tokens to compensate for the first player's advantage without giving the second player an unfair advantage in turn, that should work across most kingdoms (I imagine that number is exactly 1). The main issue that I see with this is that a 5/3 opening is a big deal in all levels of play, whereas FPA is only a big deal when both players are like in the level 60 range, so for the average ladder game, this would make the situation worse than it is now.

2) After the starting hands have been dealt, player 1 must choose either turn 1 or turn 2 and then they won't be allowed to buy anything or play any cards on that turn. Effectively, player 2 is now half a turn ahead, but player 1 is half a shuffle ahead. I have no idea if this is balanced or not, but it doesn't sound too unreasonable on paper.

10
Dominion Articles / Tempo Challenge (Puzzle/article hybrid)
« on: February 22, 2018, 05:58:47 pm »
Recently, I solved all the puzzle challenges in Prismata, partially with some help from better Prismata players, and I improved a lot as a result. So I thought that I should make a Dominion challenge in that style, and give you the sort of advice that will help you beat the challenge while also getting better at Dominion.

The challenge:

Get over 50 VP and end the game on turn 11 (or earlier) in a solo game on Dominion Online, using this kingdom:




Code: [Select]
Bureaucrat, Poacher, Bridge Troll, Counting House, Harvest, Transmute, Chapel, Courtyard, Masquerade, Village


Rules:
 - Unlike on the Puzzles forum, here you don't get to have perfect shuffle luck ó you actually have to do it. However, you are definitely allowed to resign and try again in hopes of better shuffles.
 - You are allowed to abuse the undo feature as much as you want, even for things like going back several turns and changing your buys to prevent a terminal collision.
 - Hard mode: buy Chapel before the first reshuffle

I recommend trying to solve the challenge without any help first. If you get stuck or frustrated though, down below are some tips that should help. The first tips are just some general things; the further down you read, the more specific they will get. Text in spoilers contains advice for the hard mode; I mention the hard mode in there a couple more times but those don't really help with solving it. "The conclusion" contains references to the advice so you don't want to read that either.









The advice:

  • First of all, you do need good shuffles to beat the challenge, but not unreasonably good. You can probably safely resign any game in which your important opening buys miss the second reshuffle or collide t3/t4, but if it takes you more than 5 attempts that you didn't resign on t4, there's a good chance you could be doing something better
  • Hard mode requires better shuffles, but also better playing.
  • In general, this challenge is all about maximizing your speed. Maximizing your consistency can help, but that isn't a requirement, and it can be neglected if necessary.
  • Try to think as many turns ahead as you can. If I buy this card now, will I be able to buy this other card before the next reshuffle? What will my deck be able to purchase if I draw the entire deck next turn? How much draw and Villages do I need to draw the deck next turn, and how many do I already have? Etcetera. You can use Undo to go back to a previous turn and make a different decision if you overlook something.
  • Try not to waste anything. Ideally, you will usually spend all of your coins and buys every turn, and every time you play an Action with +cards, it actually draws cards. Sometimes you have to make a compromise between wasting one thing and wasting another thing, and sometimes the best build order requires you to waste something, but avoid it whenever possible.
  • Don't overtrash. Make sure you know how many Coppers are in your deck, how many Bridge Trolls are in your deck, and always take a moment to consider the benefits of trashing a Copper (removing a stop card) vs. the benefits of not trashing it (having $1 more in your deck and for your current turn) before you trash it. If you're going for the hard mode, this will involve particularly difficult decisions at the stage where you still want to get rid of more Coppers while you also want to do things with your current turn.
  • To be more specific, you want to trash the Copper if you can't draw your deck otherwise, and you want to keep it if it allows you to go for a more convenient build order. For example, there's no point in keeping $7 of Coppers when you have 1 Bridge Troll, because you only need 6 Coppers to buy another Bridge Troll and a Village or Masquerade.
  • You should prioritize getting rid of your Estates early on.
  • To be specific, you should open Masquerade as long as you're not going for the hard mode. The opening that I had the most success with was double Masquerade, since it puts you into a really good position as long as you have good enough draws on turn 3/4 and you can reasonably quickly just resign games until you get those draws, although I also managed to beat the challenge once with the two Masqs colliding on t3.
  • You probably shouldn't buy any Silvers or Poachers (doesn't apply to hard mode). EDIT: markusin beat normal mode while buying Poacher so that can work too
  • Here's a full solution: 11926128 (you have to make a table, set minimum players to 1 and then check the load old game option to load a 1-player game)

The conclusion:

This challenge highlights a few things that are actually useful for real Dominion matches. Most directly, sometimes you're playing against a faster strategy and you have to maximize the efficiency of your build order even if it means taking some risks, which is exactly what you're doing here. But also, the basic concepts of tracking your deck, tracking your shuffles, thinking a few turns ahead and really having an idea what your deck will be concretely able to do after a few turns of building are very much present in every real game of Dominion and this challenge requires you to do those things. The main concept that I really wanted to highlight more than anything else is overtrashing or trashing too much too early, which results in having a really nice thin deck that doesn't really do anything useful, and that's exactly why you want to avoid it; you can build your deck much faster if you trash little by little while you're already building, even without taking the sort of risks involved in this challenge.

It also highlights a few things that aren't useful for real Dominion matches. In real games, you shouldn't go for a greedy opening and just hope that it works out, and you also shouldn't trash down to a very consistent deck with very few junk cards when Masquerade is around. You also can't plan your build orders this elaborately if there's an Attack present that your opponent might or might not play (but you can if you're reasonably sure they will play it).

11
Someone gave me a fully functional old IBM server machine for free, so I thought of a great use for that computer: training useless neural networks for the lulz. And so, here we are.

For the training data, I used all the Dominion cards and a bunch of fan cards whose wordings I deemed to be good (and were available as text that I could copy and paste). In practice, those fan cards were LastFootnote's Enterprise and a few random cards from other fan designers. Lastly, in order to strongly effect the data set, particularly in a destructive way, I added the entirety of Dominion: Gunpowder.

I'm still training the network some more, but in the meantime, here are some of the cards it has designed so far:

Presumably, I can reveal a Province from the Province pile


Depending on whether or not Boons are in the game, this could be worth 0 or 24


When am I allowed to play an Att?


The useless +buy aside, this is actually not that ridiculous


Whenever I play Sentry:


At least it counters Knights


It designed a totally OP Giraffe rip-off


I mean, this is actually a fairly reasonable card, just a bit weak compared to Altar


Festival too OP pls nerf


Appropriately for a Silver+, it costs $5


Combos with Watchtower


I like to think that 2xiply is some kind of a portmanteau of 2x and multiply

12
Dominion Articles / Key card-based kingdom analysis
« on: January 02, 2018, 07:11:24 am »
Key card-based kingdom analysis

This is my attempt to explain how I normally analyze kingdoms. It's recommended to read my Obstacles: Beyond the Five Deck Types article first.

Why you should or shouldn't use KCBKA

KCBKA takes advantage of your pattern recognition abilities, which are extremely good because you are a member of the human species. The benefit over, for example, AdamH's method is that this is much faster at identifying the available strategies, which frees up your time and attention span to better evaluate the pros and cons of each strategy as well as your opening buys. Some of the benefits of AdamH's method over this method are that it's easier to learn, and you're less likely to make careless mistakes.

It goes without saying that I prefer my own method, and I consistently rank in the top 50 on dominion.games to show for its usefulness. There are also roughly 49 others who have similar qualifications and I'm sure many of them analyze kingdoms in completely different ways. In summary, this is a method that works, it's not the only method that works, we have no idea which method really is the best, but I prefer this one especially for laddering. In tournament games, I do some additional analysis after applying KCBKA.

How do you analyze a kingdom using KCBKA?

1. Before you start a game, have an existing mental table of all the cards and the roles (component, support, counter, etc) they play in each strategy and roughly how strong they are in each role
2. After you start a game (i.e. when you see the kingdom), focus on cards starting with the most important ones until you find a strategy that works

In other words, there's just one simple step that you have to do each game. I make it sound very easy, but it really is very easy. If the kingdom is simple (e.g. base only), I can usually decide on a strategy in 2 or 3 seconds. The difficult part is having the table in your mind, and having a less-than-optimal table (which is inevitable, no pun intended) is the reason why you occasionally make those careless mistakes I mentioned earlier.

Constructing the table

Your table should be a collection of all the experience you've gathered while playing Dominion, specifically in regards to what each individual card has achieved, weighted towards the things that tend to matter more. For example, when you see Goons on the board, you should immediately think "engine payload!" even though Goons is also a very good card in other types of decks, and only consider the idea of Goons/BM after you have confirmed that the engine doesn't have all of its required components present on the board. Therefore, you should "mark it down" as primarily an engine payload card, and an extremely strong one too.

You should also consider card interactions here (the more you're able to consider them here, the less you have to consider them during the game). For instance, engines need cycling, and when you see Farming Village and Council Room on the board, you should immediately recognize that combination of cards as a means of cycling which is sufficient to build the engine. Similarly, you should recognize Counting House and Travelling Fair as the required components for Counting House/Travelling Fair.

Generally, the key cards are engine payloads (such as Goons), extremely strong engine components (such as Wharf), extremely strong big money enablers (such as Wharf), strong rush enablers (such as Rebuild), etc. In other words, they are reasons to go for a specific strategy. One card can be a key card for multiple different reasons, and one card can also be a key card for one reason while being a less important card for some other reason.

You should have a fair number of cards you think of as key cards. Preferably, you should aim to have one or two of them per average kingdom, but it's fine to get the occasional kingdom without any.

The table doesn't have to be very concrete. My example table provided below is, but I made it very concrete only for the purposes of demonstration; I have something more abstract in my mind.

Example table of base set cards

The relevance of each card in each role has been rated from 1 to 5 where 1 doesn't matter, 2 doesn't matter very much, 3 matters a little more, 4 is significant and 5 is a key card. Note that this is not directly a ranking of card strength (although strength is a factor to consider) ó a lot of cards, such as Poacher, don't have to catch your attention at all during kingdom analysis even though they might be strong cards, and some weak cards have to catch your attention more than some strong cards. Note also that your individual experiences with these cards might differ from this example table, which is fine.

*you wouldn't remember three-piece interactions for all expansions full random, but you would for base-only full random

Cellar
weak engine support, 2

Chapel
extremely strong engine support, 4

Moat
counters Council Room/Militia based engines, 4*
weak engine support, 2
weak big money enabler, 2

Harbinger
1

Merchant
1

Vassal
1

Village
engine cycling with terminal draw, 4
engine payload with terminal payload Actions, 4
Workshop/Gardens rush support, 2

Workshop
weak to moderate engine support, 3
enables Workshop/Gardens rush, 2

Bureaucrat
1

Gardens
very weak engine support, 2
enables Workshop/Gardens rush, 2

Militia
counters big money, 5
strong engine payload, 5
strong big money enabler, 4

Moneylender
very strong engine support, 4
weak big money support, 3

Poacher
1

Remodel
strong engine payload with Gold gainers, 5
strong engine support with $4 or $3 engine components, 4

Smithy
strong engine cycling with anti-terminals, 4
mediocre big money enabler, 4

Throne Room
strong engine cycling with terminal draw and trashing/other support, 5
strong engine payload with payload actions and trashing/other support, 5

Bandit
strong engine payload with Remodel, 5
counters big money, 4
mediocre engine payload, 4
strong big money enabler, 4

Council Room
strong engine cycling with anti-terminals, 4
mediocre big money enabler, 3
mediocre engine payload with coin-generating cards, 3

Festival
weak engine cycling with terminal draw, 4
mediocre engine payload, 3

Laboratory
weak engine cycling, 4
weak big money support, 3

Library
strong engine cycling with anti-terminals and payload actions, 5
mediocre big money enabler, 4

Market
mediocre engine payload with coin-generating cards, 3

Mine
weak engine payload, 2

Sentry
strong engine support, 4
mediocre big money support, 3

Witch
counters engine, 5
strong engine payload, 5
strong big money enabler, 5

Artisan
extremely strong engine support, 4

Identifying the strategies using key cards
First, you search for something you rated as a key card, then you check whether or not all the required components for the strategy are present. Repeat this process until you have found every key card and figured out whether those strategies are enabled. If you found at least one key card whose strategy was enabled, you can move onto deciding which of those strategies is the best by looking at everything that supports or hinders those strategies, and once you have decided on the best strategy, that's the one you're playing.

If you didn't find any key cards whose strategies were enabled, you have to start considering the next most important rating of cards, and basically do the same thing with those as you did with the key cards. If that still didn't work, you move onto the next most important rating after that, etc.

A lot of the time, you'll find exactly one key card, find out that the strategy is available, and then you immediately know you're playing that strategy.

Conclusion

I have no idea whether or not any of this made any sense to you at all, but I would hope that it did.

13
Dominion General Discussion / Magic Lamp is the dumbest card-shaped thing
« on: December 20, 2017, 03:42:55 pm »
It might as well read "Roll a 6-sided die. If it's a 6, the game is over and you win." because that's incredibly close to what it does.

14
Dominion Articles / Bard is not weak
« on: November 17, 2017, 05:55:34 am »
Here are the different effects you can get out of Bard:

1. +$2, you may discard a Treasure to gain a card costing up to $4.
You get to choose between an Ironworks-ish effect and a terminal Silver. That's super versatile and fairly strong.

2. +$3, +1 action
That's super good at hitting $5.

3. +$2, you may trash a card from your hand
That's Salvager. Salvager is a very powerful card.

4. +$3, +1 buy
That's strictly better than Horse Traders without the reaction part, which is already a decent card.

5. +$2, you may topdeck a card from your discard pile
That's strictly worse than Scavenger. Probably the worst Boon you can get, it sort of sucks if you get it without anything good in your discard pile, but even then it's no worse than having a Swindler hit an Estate or having a Militia hit two.

6. +$2, gain a Silver
That's Explorer. Considering that you only paid $4 for the card, that's very good tempo in the early game. You probably don't want it in the late game though.

7. +$2, +1 card at the end of your turn
That's great at hitting $5 and in general.

8. +$2, +1 card
That's a bit more awkward than the above, but still pretty good.

9. +$2, you may discard 3 cards to gain a Gold
If you actually want the Gold, that's super strong. If you don't, well, it's not.

10. +$2, Cartographer effect
That's a lot better than Navigator, which doesn't say much necessarily, but the difference is really big.

11. +$2, gain a Wisp
Gaining a Wisp in addition to the terminal Silver is pretty good for most decks.

12. +$2, Dungeon effect
Again, that's super good at hitting $5.


Half of these make it super likely that you hit $5 on turn 3 and/or turn 4, either allowing you to open Bard/Silver and have realistic hopes of hitting $5 twice, or Bard/trashing while still having a decent chance of hitting $5 at all. The other ones are still on-par with most other cards for hitting $5, and they give you stuff like trashing, free Wisps, and sometimes something of very low utility in addition. All in all, it doesn't do anything amazing, but it is more than sufficiently strong at what it does, which is early game economy.

15
Dominion Online at Shuffle iT / How do you pronounce "Shuffle iT"
« on: October 21, 2017, 04:42:51 am »
So basically, do you pronounce the infamous abbreviation as "shy tea" or "shit"? I've been doing the former in my head so far, but I'm not sure if that's correct.

16
Dominion Articles / Obstacles: Beyond the Five Deck Types
« on: September 14, 2017, 06:57:31 am »
Obstacles: Beyond the Five Deck Types

In this article, I attempt to lay down a very basic framework for generalizing Dominion strategy even further than it has previously been, which I think is necessary due to the increasing number of different types of strategies. Traditionally, unusual strategies have been called "combo" decks, but I think the term has outlived its usefulness and that we need a framework that actually helps us understand why those decks work instead of describing superficial attributes about them.

Part 1 Ė Obstacles

It would be convenient if you could do whatever and it would always be a functional strategy. However, this is not the case. In Dominion, there are many things that limit your ability to do whatever you want. They include:
  • Your starting deck consists of crappy cards
  • The main source of VP comes from putting crappy cards into your deck
  • You only get 5 cards and 1 buy every turn
  • You can only play one Action card every turn
  • When you buy a card, it takes a while before you even get to use it at all
  • You donít always draw cards in the order you would like
  • In order to win, you need to be able to end the game by emptying the Provinces, Colonies or any three piles while youíre ahead

At this point, you might be thinking that all of what I just said is completely obvious, in which case you would be absolutely correct. However, you cannot dismiss the importance of these factors simply because they are obvious ó on the contrary, they are obvious because of how important they are. When you are designing a strategy, you need to have a solution to each of these problems, otherwise itís not going to work. Letís refer to these seven points as the obstacles, because Iím going to be referring to them a lot.

For now, letís just focus on some strategies that are already established.

Big money (also known as good stuff)

This is a fairly common strategy, because itís available in every kingdom. Itís also extremely simple to play. Hereís how big money overcomes the obstacles:

  • You add many high-quality cards to your deck to bring the average card quality up from what it originally was (you might also trash some of the starting cards but thatís not necessary)
  • As youíre greening, you can keep adding more high-quality cards to your deck to compensate for the green cards, so that the average quality remains high enough. Also, green cards will take a while to show up because your deck is fairly big and youíre not cycling through it very fast.
  • You keep the average card quality high enough that 5 cards are enough to make the most use out of that one buy
  • The high-quality cards you add to your deck are mostly Treasures or non-terminal Actions. You can add as many terminal Actions as the rest of your deck can support without having a big risk of terminal collision or cards that are drawn dead.
  • On the other hand, when big money buys a green card, it also takes a while for that to show up. The effect is more pronounced during the greening stage due to having a larger deck, so big money actually benefits from this obstacle to an extent.
  • All the high-quality cards you buy are good on their own, have very little or no negative synergies with other cards in your deck and/or synergize with almost all the other cards in your deck, so the order in which theyíre drawn doesnít matter much ó all of your hands are good anyway.
  • Your strategy is able to maintain a steady rate of gaining VP through Provinces or Colonies after a relatively short build-up, which ultimately leads to the Provinces or Colonies being depleted.

Look at how efficient that is. Buying a lot of Treasure cards is, in and of itself, a solution to five of these completely unrelated problems. The solution to greening includes slow cycling, and the solution to slow cycling includes greening. All of this just happens to result in a convenient way to get ahead and end while youíre ahead. That is why big money is a strategy that works, and may sometimes be competitive against other types of decks.

Hermit/Market Square

Hermit/Market Square is a rare strategy, because it requires Hermit and Market Square to be in the kingdom. Here are its solutions to the obstacles:

  • Your crappy starting cards are good enough for buying Hermit and Market Square, and that is all they will ever need to do
  • You do all or most of your greening in one turn so those green cards wonít be ruining your hands for the vast majority of the game. Furthermore, after pulling off the combo, your deck will be full of Golds so youíre still in a decent position to buy more green much like a big money strategy would.
  • The combo gives you your entire deck plus a bunch of Golds to your hand and a ton of buys when you pull it off.
  • One action per turn is enough to set the combo up, and the combo gives you enough actions to pull itself off.
  • Slow cycling is fine, because you donít need the newly bought cards until the moment at which you pull off the combo, which is also the moment at which youíre able to cycle through your entire deck.
  • You have so many copies of all the relevant cards that youíre very likely to draw them in an order that you will like
  • With all of those Golds and buys, itís very easy to gain a VP lead and end the game on the spot. If not, thereís still the big money style Plan B.

In terms of efficiency, this rivals big money (in terms of strength, it tends to surpass big money, but thatís beside the point for now) because the quite detailed way in which the combo needs to be pulled off simultaneously solves each obstacle.

As you can imagine, many other strategies that have been traditionally considered to be combo strategies have a different set of solutions. Therefore, it does not make sense to classify them as the same strategy; instead, Hermit/Market Square should be seen as an entire deck type of its own.

Two sentences about Attacks

Attacks and other interactive cards, when present, might create additional obstacles for that particular kingdom that you will need to address in addition to these seven, or they might modify the existing ones. Some solutions to the seven main obstacles will already deal with certain Attacks very easily, while others might completely fall apart.

A ďDeck typeĒ or ďstrategyĒ is an elegant answer to all of the obstacles

All the different decks with the same answers are the same type of deck. In other words, the number of Action cards youíre playing, the number of Treasure cards youíre playing, the length of the game in turns, whether or not the strategy is only enabled by a rare combination of cards being available, and all these other superficial things that some like to use for the purposes of categorization are completely useless from a strategy perspective.

Figuring out the answers that rushes, slogs and engines have, respectively, is left as an exercise to the reader because this article is long enough as it is.

Part 2 Ė Beyond the five types

Wandering Winder defined four types of strategy. Then he lumped the rest of them together and called them ďcomboĒ strategies, the fifth type. However, as I already mentioned in the previous part, combo decks donít really have all that much in common with each other, which is why they shouldn't be seen as a single type of strategy. Whereas you can hurt big money decks with hand size attacks, there is no universal way to play against all combo decks.

Still, there are some useful ways to categorize those kinds of decks as well. The one fairly well established category is golden deck. These days, there are many different ways to build a golden deck, and it is a useful category because all golden decks have the same solutions to the obstacles.

Another useful category is a term Iím coining right now: the stockpile. The stockpile is a type of deck that accumulates large quantities of Reserve cards, cards on the Native Village mat, coin tokens, and/or other such resources and then it suddenly uses all of them for a megaturn. Examples of stockpiles include Native Village/Bridge, Royal Carriage/Bridge, and Duplicate/Bridge.

As the number of possible kingdoms in Dominion is limited by how many cards there are, technically there canít be an infinite number of different deck types. The point is that even if there was, this framework should be all-encompassing. The other point is that the number can be very large, and itís very likely much larger than we currently imagine it to be ó in other words, there are deck types waiting to be discovered.

Going for unconventional strategies

If youíre thinking of going for a strategy that isnít big money, rush, slog, engine, or another established strategy, it is a good idea to figure out how your strategy would address the obstacles. While it is also possible to stumble upon a legitimate strategy through pure trial-and-error (which is largely how many of them have been discovered), it is much easier if you can rule out some of the more ineffective ideas simply by taking a moment to consider them through.

For instance, a popular thing to build is an engine/big money hybrid, but that's one of the more ineffective ideas. Consider obstacle #6 ("You donít always draw cards in the order you would like") in a kingdom with Village and Smithy. Like with most card synergies, Village/Smithy synergize only when drawn in the right order. The problem with playing a hybrid between big money and engine here is this: big money's solution is to avoid too many Villages/Smithies, so cards are good in any order, while engine's solution is to get lots of Villages/Smithies so they can be paired easily, especially since pairing them draws you more cards. If you play a hybrid, you'll end up having enough Villages and Smithies that the cards are no longer good in any order, but not enough that they can be paired easily, resulting in terminal collisions, Villages drawn dead, and Villages drawn without a Smithy in your hand.

However, the stockpile is a type of strategy that does actually mix quite well with many other deck types; for instance, a big money/stockpile hybrid is just as strong as pure big money. This is due to the fact that cards like Butcher and Transmogrify are reasonably strong cards on their own, so that matches up with five of the big money solutions, and the way in which they change greening gives you the best of both worlds ó you can delay the negative effect of greening by having gaining power set aside for a while, and you can also keep adding good cards while youíre greening, because these things arenít mutually exclusive.

There are also the very rare types of strategies only enabled by a specific card interaction that we donít talk about because we still havenít discovered them. For obvious reasons, I canít give you an example. I also canít really tell you how to be able to discover more of them. But what I can tell you is that the obstacles apply universally in all games of Dominion ever, so youíre going to need the elegant solution.

The parting words

With all that being said, this idea is relatively new, so it might also be incomplete. You can sort of see its evolution if you look at my posts from the past year or so; within that time, I have moved from firmly sticking with WWís deck types (including ďcomboĒ) to claiming that hoarding coin tokens should be classified as its own strategy even though it sucks, to claiming that Native Village/Bridge is also the same strategy as the coin token hoarding strategy and that it should no longer be classified as a combo deck, to claiming that golden decks are another legitimate deck type, and now we have this.

I might be failing to see some obstacles that are actually there. I have already considered some rules of the game that kind of hinder you a little, such as not being able to look through your discard pile or not being able to see your opponentís hand, but you canít really fix those with deckbuilding so I donít see a reason to treat them as obstacles.

Ultimately, I think that as the number and the complexity of card-shaped things keeps going up, we are going to see more and more of completely new types of strategies, and simply calling them all ďcomboĒ is not going to make us prepared for them. There certainly needs to be some kind of a framework that allows us to understand what made a strategy work even when it doesnít fit our preconceived notions of how strategies should be categorized. This has been an early attempt at it.

17
Hearthstone / Uninteresting Hearthstone moments
« on: August 17, 2017, 08:24:50 am »
I just had two Lich Kings in play and a Drakkari Enchanter in hand (on Arena). It wasn't the correct play to play the Drakkari Enchanter, since I had to use that mana for Peacekeeping an opponent's Core Hound.

18
Game Reports / I opened Pirate Ship and won
« on: July 20, 2017, 06:21:04 am »
Turn 4 - Awaclus
A buys an Advance.
A trashes a Pirate Ship.
A gains a Council Room.
A shuffles their deck.

19
Dominion General Discussion / Golden Sombrero question
« on: July 09, 2017, 05:41:51 am »
Does it count as a golden sombrero if your opening $5 misses the shuffle and you didn't buy another card in the opening?

20
Man, trash for benefit. It's such a crappy term. It's even worse than "village". Here are all the problems with it:

1) It means different things to different people. Apprentice is clearly TfB according to everyone, but some might say that Forager is TfB because the benefit is dependent on trashing something and some would say that it's not because it doesn't depend on the cost of the trashed card.

2) It's not an overwhelmingly useful term, partially because of its ambiguity too, but mostly because regardless of its meaning, it doesn't ever encompass all of the things that have everything relevant in common with the things that it does encompass. If the point is to care about cost, the part about trashing isn't really relevant and stuff like Chariot Race should be included in the same category. If the point is that you're trashing something while you also maintain tempo, then cards like Masquerade and Loan should be included in the group. If the point is that you need to keep replacing the cards you trash in order to keep benefiting, then stuff like Pillage should be included. All three of these categories have reasons why they are useful for strategy discussion, but it might be the huge overlap with "TfB" that's preventing these categories from entering the picture.

21
7 Provinces and a 3-pile ending on turn 12. Interestingly enough, this also has Travelling Fair and Fool's Gold in it.

Kingdom:





Game #: 2240582

Code: [Select]
A starts with 7 Coppers and 3 Estates.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws 4 Coppers and an Estate.
t starts with 7 Coppers and 3 Estates.
t shuffles their deck.
t draws 3 Coppers and 2 Estates.

Turn 1 - Awaclus
A plays 4 Coppers.
A buys and gains a Bridge.
A draws 3 Coppers and 2 Estates.

Turn 1 - tcal87
t plays 3 Coppers.
t buys and gains a Chapel.
t draws 4 Coppers and an Estate.

Turn 2 - Awaclus
A plays 2 Coppers.
A buys and gains a Chapel.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws 3 Coppers, a Chapel and a Bridge.

Turn 2 - tcal87
t plays 4 Coppers.
t buys and gains a Bridge.
t shuffles their deck.
t draws 3 Coppers and 2 Estates.

Turn 3 - Awaclus
A plays a Chapel.
A trashes 3 Coppers.
A draws 2 Coppers and 3 Estates.

Turn 3 - tcal87
t plays 3 Coppers.
t buys and gains a Silver.
t draws 2 Coppers, an Estate, a Chapel and a Bridge.

Turn 4 - Awaclus
A plays 2 Coppers.
A buys and gains a Fool's Gold.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws 3 Coppers, a Chapel and a Fool's Gold.

Turn 4 - tcal87
t plays a Chapel.
t trashes 2 Coppers and an Estate.
t shuffles their deck.
t draws 4 Coppers and a Chapel.

Turn 5 - Awaclus
A plays a Chapel.
A trashes 3 Coppers.
A draws a Copper, 3 Estates and a Bridge.

Turn 5 - tcal87
t plays a Chapel.
t trashes 4 Coppers.
t draws a Copper, a Silver, 2 Estates and a Bridge.

Turn 6 - Awaclus
A plays a Bridge.
A plays a Copper.
A buys and gains 2 Fool's Golds.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Copper, 2 Estates, a Chapel and a Fool's Gold.

Turn 6 - tcal87
t plays a Bridge.
t plays a Copper and a Silver.
t buys and gains a Treasury.
t shuffles their deck.
t draws a Copper, 2 Estates, a Chapel and a Treasury.

Turn 7 - Awaclus
A plays a Chapel.
A trashes a Copper and 2 Estates.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws an Estate, a Bridge and 3 Fool's Golds.

Turn 7 - tcal87
t plays a Treasury.
t draws a Silver.
t plays a Chapel.
t trashes 2 Estates.
t plays a Copper and a Silver.
t buys and gains a Fool's Gold.
t topdecks a Treasury.
t shuffles their deck.
t draws a Copper, a Chapel, a Bridge, a Treasury and a Fool's Gold.

Turn 8 - Awaclus
A plays a Bridge.
A plays 3 Fool's Golds.
A buys 2 Travelling Fairs and a Fool's Gold.
A gains a Fool's Gold.
A reacts with a Travelling Fair.
A topdecks a Fool's Gold.
A buys and gains a Fool's Gold.
A reacts with a Travelling Fair.
A topdecks a Fool's Gold.
A buys and gains a Fool's Gold.
A reacts with a Travelling Fair.
A topdecks a Fool's Gold.
A buys and gains a Fool's Gold.
A reacts with a Travelling Fair.
A topdecks a Fool's Gold.
A draws a Chapel and 4 Fool's Golds.

Turn 8 - tcal87
t plays a Treasury.
t draws a Silver.
t plays a Bridge.
t plays a Fool's Gold, a Copper and a Silver.
t buys and gains 2 Fool's Golds.
t topdecks a Treasury.
t shuffles their deck.
t draws a Copper, a Silver, a Chapel, a Treasury and a Fool's Gold.

Turn 9 - Awaclus
A plays 4 Fool's Golds.
A buys a Travelling Fair and a Summon.
A gains a Bridge.
A sets a Bridge aside.
A buys a Summon.
A gains a Bridge.
A sets a Bridge aside.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Chapel and 4 Fool's Golds.

Turn 9 - tcal87
t plays a Treasury.
t draws a Fool's Gold.
t plays a Chapel.
t trashes a Copper.
t plays 2 Fool's Golds and a Silver.
t buys a Travelling Fair and a Bridge.
t gains a Bridge.
t reacts with a Travelling Fair.
t topdecks a Bridge.
t topdecks a Treasury.
t shuffles their deck.
t draws a Chapel, 2 Bridges, a Treasury and a Fool's Gold.

Turn 10 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A summons a Bridge.
A plays a Bridge.
A summons a Bridge.
A plays a Bridge.
A plays 4 Fool's Golds.
A buys a Summon.
A gains a Hunting Grounds.
A sets a Hunting Grounds aside.
A buys a Summon.
A gains a Market.
A sets a Market aside.
A buys a Summon.
A gains a Market.
A sets a Market aside.
A draws an Estate, a Bridge and 3 Fool's Golds.

Turn 10 - tcal87
t plays a Treasury.
t draws a Fool's Gold.
t plays a Bridge.
t plays 2 Fool's Golds.
t buys a Summon.
t gains a Market.
t sets a Market aside.
t topdecks a Treasury.
t shuffles their deck.
t draws a Silver, a Bridge, a Treasury and 2 Fool's Golds.

Turn 11 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A summons a Hunting Grounds.
A plays a Hunting Grounds.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Chapel, a Bridge and 2 Fool's Golds.
A summons a Market.
A plays a Market.
A draws a Fool's Gold.
A summons a Market.
A plays a Market.
A draws a Bridge.
A plays a Bridge.
A plays a Bridge.
A plays a Chapel.
A trashes an Estate.
A plays 6 Fool's Golds.
A buys a Summon.
A gains a Hunting Grounds.
A sets a Hunting Grounds aside.
A buys a Summon.
A gains a Market.
A sets a Market aside.
A buys a Summon.
A gains a Market.
A sets a Market aside.
A buys a Summon.
A gains a Market.
A sets a Market aside.
A buys a Summon.
A gains a Bridge.
A sets a Bridge aside.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Chapel, a Market, 2 Bridges and a Fool's Gold.

Turn 11 - tcal87
t starts their turn.
t summons a Market.
t plays a Market.
t draws a Chapel.
t plays a Treasury.
t draws a Bridge.
t plays a Bridge.
t plays a Bridge.
t plays 2 Fool's Golds and a Silver.
t buys a Summon.
t gains a Market.
t sets a Market aside.
t buys and gains 3 Bridges.
t topdecks a Treasury.
t shuffles their deck.
t draws a Market, 2 Bridges, a Treasury and a Fool's Gold.

Turn 12 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A summons a Hunting Grounds.
A plays a Hunting Grounds.
A draws 3 Fool's Golds and a Hunting Grounds.
A summons a Market.
A plays a Market.
A draws a Fool's Gold.
A summons a Bridge.
A plays a Bridge.
A summons a Market.
A plays a Market.
A draws a Market.
A summons a Market.
A plays a Market.
A draws a Fool's Gold.
A plays a Market.
A draws a Bridge.
A plays a Market.
A draws a Fool's Gold.
A plays a Bridge.
A plays a Bridge.
A plays a Bridge.
A plays 7 Fool's Golds.
A buys and gains 5 Provinces, 3 Markets and a Bridge.
A buys a Travelling Fair and a Province.
A gains a Province.
A buys and gains a Province.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Province, 3 Markets and a Bridge.

22
Other Games / Senran Kagura
« on: March 20, 2017, 07:06:13 pm »
I've recently started playing Senran Kagura Shinovi Versus, which is my first game in this series. It's a ton of fun. I'm using a mouse and a keyboard, which is clearly not ideal for this game, but it kind of works, it's just a little more challenging this way.

And because there wasn't a thread for Senran Kagura, I thought I'd make one. Has anyone else gotten into it?

23
Dominion General Discussion / Rules mess ups you haven't seen?
« on: March 09, 2017, 12:05:06 pm »
What are some of the best rules mess ups you have never seen?

Here are a couple of my favorites:

 - thinking that you can trash Silver with Moneylender
 - trying to count the cards in your hand when playing Philosopher's Stone

24
Game Reports / Overcoming a lost 6-2 Colony split with Wild Hunt
« on: March 01, 2017, 01:54:14 pm »
There was apparently some confusion regarding the strength of Wild Hunt in the Qvist's ranking threads, so I'll just leave this here.





Colonies

Game #1609770

Code: [Select]
k starts with 7 Coppers and 3 Estates.
k shuffles their deck.
k draws 4 Coppers and an Estate.
A starts with 7 Coppers and 3 Estates.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws 3 Coppers and 2 Estates.

Turn 1 - kingdedede777
k plays 4 Coppers.
k buys and gains a Militia.
k draws 3 Coppers and 2 Estates.

Turn 1 - Awaclus
A plays 3 Coppers.
A buys and gains a Lighthouse.
A draws 4 Coppers and an Estate.

Turn 2 - kingdedede777
k plays 3 Coppers.
k buys and gains a Lighthouse.
k shuffles their deck.
k draws 2 Coppers, an Estate, a Militia and a Lighthouse.

Turn 2 - Awaclus
A plays 3 Coppers.
A buys and gains a Shanty Town.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws 3 Coppers and 2 Estates.

Turn 3 - kingdedede777
k plays a Lighthouse.
k plays a Militia.
A discards 2 Estates.
k plays 2 Coppers.
k buys and gains an Apprentice.
k draws 4 Coppers and an Estate.

Turn 3 - Awaclus
A plays 2 Coppers.
A buys and gains a Lighthouse.
A draws 3 Coppers, an Estate and a Lighthouse.

Turn 4 - kingdedede777
k starts their turn.
k gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
k plays 4 Coppers.
k buys a Mint.
k trashes 4 Coppers.
k gains a Mint.
k shuffles their deck.
k draws 3 Coppers and 2 Estates.

Turn 4 - Awaclus
A plays a Lighthouse.
A plays 3 Coppers.
A buys and gains a Shanty Town.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws 4 Coppers and a Shanty Town.

Turn 5 - kingdedede777
k plays 3 Coppers.
k buys and gains a Silver.
k draws an Estate, a Militia, a Lighthouse, an Apprentice and a Mint.

Turn 5 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A draws an Estate and a Shanty Town.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A draws a Copper and an Estate.
A plays 5 Coppers.
A buys a Mint.
A trashes 5 Coppers.
A gains a Mint.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws 2 Coppers, an Estate, a Shanty Town and a Lighthouse.

Turn 6 - kingdedede777
k plays an Apprentice.
k trashes a Mint.
k shuffles their deck.
k draws 3 Coppers, a Silver and an Estate.
k plays a Lighthouse.
k plays a Militia.
A discards a Copper and an Estate.
k plays 3 Coppers and a Silver.
k buys and gains a Gold.
k shuffles their deck.
k draws a Silver, a Gold, 2 Estates and a Militia.

Turn 6 - Awaclus
A plays a Lighthouse.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A draws a Lighthouse and a Mint.
A plays a Lighthouse.
A plays a Copper.
A buys and gains an Enchantress.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws 2 Coppers, 2 Estates and a Shanty Town.

Turn 7 - kingdedede777
k starts their turn.
k gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
k plays a Militia.
k plays a Gold and a Silver.
k buys and gains a Gold.
k draws 3 Coppers, an Estate and an Apprentice.

Turn 7 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
A gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A draws a Shanty Town and a Mint.
A plays a Mint.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A draws an Estate and an Enchantress.
A plays an Enchantress.
A plays 2 Coppers.
A buys and gains a Silver.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Copper, a Silver, an Estate, a Shanty Town and a Mint.

Turn 8 - kingdedede777
k plays an Apprentice.
k shuffles their deck.
k draws a Gold.
k plays a Gold and 3 Coppers.
k buys and gains a Lighthouse.
k draws a Gold, 2 Estates, a Militia and a Lighthouse.

Turn 8 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A draws a Copper and an Estate (Enchantress).
A plays a Mint.
A reveals a Silver.
A gains a Silver.
A plays 2 Coppers and a Silver.
A buys and gains a Shanty Town.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws an Estate, 2 Shanty Towns and 2 Lighthouses.

Turn 9 - kingdedede777
k plays a Lighthouse.
k plays a Militia.
A discards an Estate and a Shanty Town.
k plays a Gold.
k buys and gains a Shanty Town.
k shuffles their deck.
k draws a Copper, a Silver, a Militia, a Shanty Town and a Lighthouse.

Turn 9 - Awaclus
A plays a Lighthouse.
A plays a Lighthouse.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A draws a Copper and an Enchantress.
A plays an Enchantress.
A plays a Copper.
A buys and gains an Enchantress.
A draws 2 Silvers, 2 Estates and a Mint.

Turn 10 - kingdedede777
k starts their turn.
k gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
k plays a Lighthouse.
k plays a Militia.
k plays a Copper and a Silver.
k buys and gains a Gold.
k draws a Copper, a Gold, 2 Estates and an Apprentice.

Turn 10 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
A gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
A draws a Copper and a Shanty Town (Enchantress).
A plays 2 Silvers and a Copper.
A buys and gains an Apprentice.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Silver, 2 Shanty Towns, a Lighthouse and an Apprentice.

Turn 11 - kingdedede777
k starts their turn.
k gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
k plays an Apprentice.
k trashes an Estate.
k draws a Gold and an Estate.
k plays 2 Golds and a Copper.
k buys and gains a Gold.
k shuffles their deck.
k draws 2 Coppers, a Gold, an Estate and a Lighthouse.

Turn 11 - Awaclus
A plays an Apprentice.
A trashes a Silver.
A draws a Copper, a Silver and a Mint.
A plays a Lighthouse.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Mint.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A draws a Copper and an Enchantress.
A plays an Enchantress.
A plays 2 Coppers and a Silver.
A buys and gains a Wild Hunt.
A draws 3 Estates, a Lighthouse and an Enchantress.

Turn 12 - kingdedede777
k plays a Lighthouse.
k draws a Gold.
k plays 2 Golds and 2 Coppers.
k buys and gains an Apprentice.
k draws a Copper, a Silver, a Gold, a Militia and an Apprentice.

Turn 12 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
A shuffles their deck.
A draws 2 Shanty Towns (Enchantress).
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Lighthouse.
A plays an Enchantress.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A draws 2 Coppers.
A plays 2 Coppers.
A buys and gains a Duplicate.
A draws a Silver, a Shanty Town, an Apprentice, a Mint and a Wild Hunt.

Turn 13 - kingdedede777
k plays a Militia.
k draws a Lighthouse.
k plays a Lighthouse.
k plays an Apprentice.
k trashes a Silver.
k draws a Gold, an Estate and a Shanty Town.
k plays a Shanty Town.
k reveals 2 Shanty Towns, an Apprentice, a Colony and a Gold.
k shuffles their deck.
k draws a Gold and an Estate.
k plays 3 Golds and a Copper.
k buys and gains a Platinum.
k draws 2 Coppers, a Gold, a Lighthouse and an Apprentice.

Turn 13 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
A shuffles their deck.
A draws an Estate and an Enchantress (Enchantress).
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Shanty Town, a Lighthouse and a Duplicate.
A plays an Apprentice.
A trashes an Estate.
A draws a Copper and a Shanty Town.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Lighthouse.
A plays a Duplicate.
A puts a Duplicate on their Tavern mat.
A plays an Enchantress.
A plays a Silver and a Copper.
A buys a Pilgrimage.
A flips Journey token face down.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Copper, a Silver, 2 Estates and a Shanty Town.

Turn 14 - kingdedede777
k starts their turn.
k gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
k plays a Lighthouse.
k plays an Apprentice.
k trashes a Gold.
k shuffles their deck.
k draws 2 Golds, an Estate, a Militia, a Shanty Town and a Platinum.
k plays a Militia.
k plays 2 Golds, 2 Coppers and a Platinum.
k buys and gains a Colony.
k shuffles their deck.
k draws a Copper, a Gold, an Estate and 2 Apprentices.

Turn 14 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
A draws a Copper and an Enchantress (Enchantress).
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays an Enchantress.
A plays a Silver and 2 Coppers.
A buys and gains a Wild Hunt.
A calls a Duplicate.
A gains a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Shanty Town, a Lighthouse, an Apprentice, a Mint and a Wild Hunt.

Turn 15 - kingdedede777
k starts their turn.
k gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
k plays an Apprentice.
k trashes an Estate.
k draws a Copper and a Shanty Town.
k plays an Apprentice.
k trashes a Gold.
k draws a Copper, a Gold, an Estate, a Militia, a Lighthouse and a Platinum.
k plays a Lighthouse.
k plays a Militia.
A discards a Lighthouse and a Mint.
k plays a Gold, 3 Coppers and a Platinum.
k buys and gains a Platinum.
k shuffles their deck.
k draws 2 Coppers, a Gold, an Estate and a Colony.

Turn 15 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws 2 Shanty Towns (Enchantress).
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws 2 Coppers and a Duplicate.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays an Apprentice.
A trashes a Copper.
A plays a Duplicate.
A puts a Duplicate on their Tavern mat.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A draws a Mint and a Wild Hunt.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws an Estate, an Enchantress and a Wild Hunt.
A plays an Enchantress.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Silver, an Estate, 2 Lighthouses and a Mint.

Turn 16 - kingdedede777
k starts their turn.
k gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
k plays a Gold and 2 Coppers.
k buys and gains a Wild Hunt.
k draws a Copper, a Shanty Town, 2 Apprentices and a Platinum.

Turn 16 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A draws an Apprentice and a Wild Hunt (Enchantress).
A plays an Apprentice.
A trashes an Estate.
A draws an Estate and a Wild Hunt.
A plays a Lighthouse.
A plays a Lighthouse.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Shanty Town, an Enchantress and a Wild Hunt.
A plays a Silver.
A buys and gains a Shanty Town.
A calls a Duplicate.
A gains a Shanty Town.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Copper, 3 Shanty Towns and a Wild Hunt.

Turn 17 - kingdedede777
k plays an Apprentice.
k trashes a Copper.
k plays a Platinum.
k buys and gains a Shanty Town.
k shuffles their deck.
k draws a Gold, a Militia, 2 Lighthouses and a Platinum.

Turn 17 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
A gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Silver, a Shanty Town and a Mint.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Mint.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A draws a Shanty Town and a Wild Hunt.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws an Estate, an Apprentice and a Wild Hunt.
A plays an Apprentice.
A trashes an Estate.
A draws 2 Enchantresses.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays an Enchantress.
A plays an Enchantress.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A gains an Estate.
A takes 6 VP from the Wild Hunt pile.
A plays a Copper and a Silver.
A buys a Pilgrimage.
A flips Journey token face up.
A gains a Shanty Town, an Enchantress and a Wild Hunt.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws an Estate, 2 Shanty Towns, a Mint and a Duplicate.

Turn 18 - kingdedede777
k plays a Lighthouse.
k draws a Shanty Town.
k plays a Lighthouse.
k plays a Militia.
A discards a Mint and a Duplicate.
k plays a Gold and a Platinum.
k buys and gains a Colony.
k draws 2 Coppers, a Gold, a Shanty Town and a Platinum.

Turn 18 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A draws a Silver, a Shanty Town, an Enchantress and a Wild Hunt (Enchantress).
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Shanty Town, a Lighthouse and a Wild Hunt.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Shanty Town, an Apprentice and a Wild Hunt.
A plays an Apprentice.
A trashes an Estate.
A draws a Shanty Town and a Lighthouse.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Copper, a Mint and a Wild Hunt.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays an Enchantress.
A plays a Lighthouse.
A plays a Lighthouse.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A gains an Estate.
A takes 3 VP from the Wild Hunt pile.
A plays a Silver and a Copper.
A buys and gains a Shanty Town.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws an Estate, 2 Shanty Towns, a Duplicate and a Wild Hunt.

Turn 19 - kingdedede777
k starts their turn.
k gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
k plays a Gold, 2 Coppers and a Platinum.
k buys and gains a Colony.
k draws an Estate, 2 Apprentices, a Colony and a Wild Hunt.

Turn 19 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
A gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
A draws a Shanty Town and a Mint (Enchantress).
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Silver, a Shanty Town and an Enchantress.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays an Enchantress.
A plays a Duplicate.
A puts a Duplicate on their Tavern mat.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Silver.
A buys a Pilgrimage.
A flips Journey token face down.
A draws 2 Shanty Towns, an Apprentice, an Enchantress and a Wild Hunt.

Turn 20 - kingdedede777
k plays an Apprentice.
k shuffles their deck.
k draws a Copper.
k plays an Apprentice.
k trashes an Estate.
k draws a Copper and a Lighthouse.
k plays a Lighthouse.
k plays a Wild Hunt.
k gains an Estate.
k takes 1 VP from the Wild Hunt pile.
k plays 2 Coppers.
k buys and gains a Shanty Town.
k draws 2 Golds, a Shanty Town, a Lighthouse and a Colony.

Turn 20 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A draws a Copper and a Shanty Town (Enchantress).
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Shanty Town and 2 Wild Hunts.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Mint, an Enchantress and a Wild Hunt.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Silver and 2 Shanty Towns.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Shanty Town and 2 Lighthouses.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Lighthouse.
A plays a Lighthouse.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays an Enchantress.
A plays a Mint.
A reveals a Silver.
A gains a Silver.
A plays an Apprentice.
A trashes a Silver.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Silver and an Estate.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays an Enchantress.
A plays a Copper and a Silver.
A buys a Pilgrimage.
A flips Journey token face up.
A gains a Wild Hunt.
A calls a Duplicate.
A gains a Wild Hunt.
A gains a Silver and an Enchantress.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Silver, a Shanty Town, a Duplicate, an Enchantress and a Wild Hunt.

Turn 21 - kingdedede777
k starts their turn.
k gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
k plays a Lighthouse.
k plays a Shanty Town.
k reveals 2 Shanty Towns, an Apprentice, a Colony and a Gold.
k draws a Shanty Town and a Platinum.
k plays a Shanty Town.
k reveals 2 Shanty Towns, an Apprentice, a Colony and a Gold.
k draws a Militia and a Colony.
k plays a Militia.
k plays 2 Golds and a Platinum.
k buys and gains a Colony.
k shuffles their deck.
k draws a Gold, a Lighthouse, a Colony and 2 Platina.

Turn 21 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
A gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
A draws 3 Shanty Towns and a Mint (Enchantress).
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Copper, an Enchantress and a Wild Hunt.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Silver, a Shanty Town and a Wild Hunt.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws an Estate and 2 Wild Hunts.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws 2 Shanty Towns and a Wild Hunt.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws an Apprentice.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A gains an Estate.
A takes 9 VP from the Wild Hunt pile.
A plays an Apprentice.
A trashes an Estate.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws an Estate.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays an Enchantress.
A plays an Enchantress.
A plays 2 Silvers and a Copper.
A buys and gains a Gold.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws 2 Silvers, a Gold and 2 Shanty Towns.

Turn 22 - kingdedede777
k starts their turn.
k gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
k plays a Lighthouse.
k plays a Gold and 2 Platina.
k buys and gains a Colony.
k draws an Estate, a Shanty Town, an Apprentice, a Colony and a Wild Hunt.

Turn 22 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A draws a Shanty Town, a Lighthouse, a Mint and a Wild Hunt (Enchantress).
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Shanty Town, a Lighthouse and a Wild Hunt.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Shanty Town, an Apprentice and a Duplicate.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays an Apprentice.
A trashes a Silver.
A draws a Copper and 2 Wild Hunts.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws an Estate, an Enchantress and a Wild Hunt.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Shanty Town, an Enchantress and a Wild Hunt.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Shanty Town.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A gains an Estate.
A takes 5 VP from the Wild Hunt pile.
A plays a Lighthouse.
A plays a Lighthouse.
A plays an Enchantress.
A plays an Enchantress.
A plays a Gold, a Silver and a Copper.
A buys and gains a Province.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws an Estate, an Apprentice, an Enchantress and 2 Wild Hunts.

Turn 23 - kingdedede777
k starts their turn.
k gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
k plays an Apprentice.
k trashes an Estate.
k draws a Gold and a Colony.
k plays a Shanty Town.
k reveals 2 Shanty Towns, an Apprentice, a Colony and a Gold.
k plays a Wild Hunt.
k draws a Copper, a Militia and an Apprentice.
k plays an Apprentice.
k trashes a Militia.
k draws a Copper, 2 Shanty Towns and a Colony.
k plays a Shanty Town.
k reveals 2 Shanty Towns, an Apprentice, a Colony and a Gold.
k plays a Shanty Town.
k reveals 2 Shanty Towns, an Apprentice, a Colony and a Gold.
k shuffles their deck.
k draws a Lighthouse and a Colony.
k plays a Lighthouse.
k plays a Gold and 2 Coppers.
k buys and gains an Apprentice.
k shuffles their deck.
k draws a Gold, a Colony, 2 Platina and a Wild Hunt.

Turn 23 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
A gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
A draws 2 Shanty Towns and 2 Wild Hunts (Enchantress).
A plays an Apprentice.
A trashes an Estate.
A draws a Silver and a Shanty Town.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Copper, a Gold and an Enchantress.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Shanty Town and 2 Wild Hunts.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws an Estate, a Shanty Town and a Mint.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws 2 Shanty Towns and a Duplicate.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Mint.
A reveals a Gold.
A gains a Gold.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Gold and a Province.
A plays an Enchantress.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A gains an Estate.
A takes 6 VP from the Wild Hunt pile.
A plays 2 Golds, a Silver and a Copper.
A buys and gains a Colony.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Shanty Town, an Enchantress and 3 Wild Hunts.

Turn 24 - kingdedede777
k starts their turn.
k gets +1 Coin (Lighthouse).
k plays a Gold and 2 Platina.
k buys and gains a Colony.
k draws a Gold, 2 Shanty Towns, an Apprentice and a Colony.

Turn 24 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A draws an Estate and a Shanty Town (Enchantress).
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Shanty Town, a Lighthouse and an Enchantress.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Silver, a Shanty Town and a Wild Hunt.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Shanty Town, an Apprentice and a Mint.
A plays an Apprentice.
A trashes a Mint.
A draws an Estate, a Province, a Lighthouse, a Colony and a Wild Hunt.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws a Copper, a Shanty Town and an Enchantress.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A draws 2 Golds and a Wild Hunt.
A plays a Shanty Town.
A reveals 2 Shanty Towns, a Province, a Colony and a Duplicate.
A plays a Lighthouse.
A plays a Lighthouse.
A plays a Wild Hunt.
A gains an Estate.
A takes 5 VP from the Wild Hunt pile.
A plays 2 Golds, a Silver and a Copper.
A buys and gains a Colony.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Province, 2 Shanty Towns, a Colony and a Duplicate.

Ultimately, I had a 63-61 lead thanks to 34 VP tokens gained from Wild Hunts. In all fairness, my opponent played suboptimally, but I might have played suboptimally as well and I definitely had some crappy shuffles (I feel like I was maybe 2 turns behind what I expected).

25
Kingdom:




Game id: 1429334

Code: [Select]
L starts with 7 Coppers and 3 Estates.
L shuffles their deck.
L draws 4 Coppers and an Estate.
A starts with 7 Coppers and 3 Estates.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws 4 Coppers and an Estate.

Turn 1 - Lemira
L plays 4 Coppers.
L buys and gains an Advisor.
L draws 3 Coppers and 2 Estates.

Turn 1 - Awaclus
A plays 4 Coppers.
A buys a Travelling Fair and a Fool's Gold.
A gains a Fool's Gold.
A reacts with a Travelling Fair.
A topdecks a Fool's Gold.
A draws 2 Coppers, 2 Estates and a Fool's Gold.

Turn 2 - Lemira
L plays 3 Coppers.
L buys and gains a Fool's Gold.
L shuffles their deck.
L draws 2 Coppers, 2 Estates and an Advisor.

Turn 2 - Awaclus
A plays a Copper and a Fool's Gold.
A buys and gains a Fool's Gold.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws 3 Coppers, an Estate and a Fool's Gold.

Turn 3 - Lemira
L plays an Advisor.
L reveals 2 Coppers and a Fool's Gold.
L discards a Fool's Gold.
L puts 2 Coppers into their hand.
L plays 4 Coppers.
L buys and gains an Advisor.
L shuffles their deck.
L draws 4 Coppers and an Estate.

Turn 3 - Awaclus
A plays 3 Coppers and a Fool's Gold.
A buys a Travelling Fair and a Fool's Gold.
A gains a Fool's Gold.
A reacts with a Travelling Fair.
A topdecks a Fool's Gold.
A draws 2 Coppers, an Estate and 2 Fool's Golds.

Turn 4 - Lemira
L plays 4 Coppers.
L buys and gains an Advisor.
L draws 2 Coppers, an Estate and 2 Advisors.

Turn 4 - Awaclus
A plays 2 Coppers and 2 Fool's Golds.
A buys a Travelling Fair and a Fool's Gold.
A gains a Fool's Gold.
A reacts with a Travelling Fair.
A topdecks a Fool's Gold.
A buys and gains a Fool's Gold.
A reacts with a Travelling Fair.
A topdecks a Fool's Gold.
A draws 2 Coppers, an Estate and 2 Fool's Golds.

Turn 5 - Lemira
L plays an Advisor.
L reveals a Copper, an Estate and a Fool's Gold.
L discards a Fool's Gold.
L puts a Copper and an Estate into their hand.
L plays an Advisor.
L shuffles their deck.
L reveals a Copper, an Estate and an Advisor.
L discards an Advisor.
L puts a Copper and an Estate into their hand.
L plays 4 Coppers.
L buys and gains an Advisor.
L shuffles their deck.
L draws 3 Coppers, an Estate and a Fool's Gold.

Turn 5 - Awaclus
A plays 2 Coppers and 2 Fool's Golds.
A buys a Travelling Fair and a Fool's Gold.
A gains a Fool's Gold.
A reacts with a Travelling Fair.
A topdecks a Fool's Gold.
A buys and gains a Gladiator.
A reacts with a Travelling Fair.
A topdecks a Gladiator.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Copper, 3 Fool's Golds and a Gladiator.

Turn 6 - Lemira
L plays 3 Coppers and a Fool's Gold.
L buys and gains an Advisor.
L draws 3 Coppers and 2 Advisors.

Turn 6 - Awaclus
A plays a Gladiator.
A reveals a Fool's Gold.
A trashes a Gladiator.
A plays a Copper and 3 Fool's Golds.
A buys 2 Travelling Fairs and a Fool's Gold.
A gains a Fool's Gold.
A reacts with a Travelling Fair.
A topdecks a Fool's Gold.
A buys and gains a Fool's Gold.
A reacts with a Travelling Fair.
A topdecks a Fool's Gold.
A buys and gains a Fool's Gold.
A reacts with a Travelling Fair.
A topdecks a Fool's Gold.
A draws 2 Coppers and 3 Fool's Golds.

Turn 7 - Lemira
L plays an Advisor.
L reveals 2 Estates and an Advisor.
L discards an Advisor.
L puts 2 Estates into their hand.
L plays an Advisor.
L shuffles their deck.
L reveals a Copper, an Estate and an Advisor.
L discards an Advisor.
L puts a Copper and an Estate into their hand.
L plays 4 Coppers.
L buys and gains an Advisor.
L draws 2 Coppers, a Fool's Gold and 2 Advisors.

Turn 7 - Awaclus
A plays 2 Coppers and 3 Fool's Golds.
A buys a Travelling Fair and a Royal Blacksmith.
A takes 8 debt.
A gains a Royal Blacksmith.
A reacts with a Travelling Fair.
A topdecks a Royal Blacksmith.
A repays 8 debt.
A buys a Royal Blacksmith.
A takes 8 debt.
A gains a Royal Blacksmith.
A repays 1 debt (7 remaining).
A draws a Copper, an Estate, 2 Fool's Golds and a Royal Blacksmith.

Turn 8 - Lemira
L plays an Advisor.
L shuffles their deck.
L reveals 3 Coppers.
L discards a Copper.
L puts 2 Coppers into their hand.
L plays an Advisor.
L reveals a Copper and 2 Advisors.
L discards an Advisor.
L puts a Copper and an Advisor into their hand.
L plays an Advisor.
L reveals an Estate and 2 Advisors.
L discards an Advisor.
L puts an Estate and an Advisor into their hand.
L plays an Advisor.
L reveals a Copper and 2 Estates.
L discards a Copper.
L puts 2 Estates into their hand.
L plays 5 Coppers and a Fool's Gold.
L buys and gains a Sir Michael.
L shuffles their deck.
L draws 4 Coppers and an Advisor.

Turn 8 - Awaclus
A plays a Royal Blacksmith.
A draws 2 Coppers, 2 Estates and a Fool's Gold.
A reveals a Merchant, 2 Coppers, a Scheme and a Fool's Gold.
A discards 3 Coppers.
A plays 3 Fool's Golds.
A repays 7 debt.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws 2 Coppers, an Estate, a Fool's Gold and a Royal Blacksmith.

Turn 9 - Lemira
L plays an Advisor.
L reveals an Estate, a Sir Michael and an Advisor.
L discards an Advisor.
L puts an Estate and a Sir Michael into their hand.
L plays a Sir Michael.
A discards a Copper and an Estate.
A reveals a Copper and a Fool's Gold.
A discards a Copper and a Fool's Gold.
L plays 4 Coppers.
L buys and gains an Advisor.
L draws 2 Coppers and 3 Advisors.

Turn 9 - Awaclus
A plays a Royal Blacksmith.
A draws 2 Coppers and 3 Fool's Golds.
A reveals a Merchant, 2 Coppers, a Scheme and a Fool's Gold.
A discards 3 Coppers.
A plays 4 Fool's Golds.
A buys a Travelling Fair and a Summon.
A gains an Advisor.
A sets an Advisor aside.
A buys a Summon.
A gains a Gladiator.
A sets a Gladiator aside.
A draws a Copper, 2 Estates, a Fool's Gold and a Royal Blacksmith.

Turn 10 - Lemira
L plays an Advisor.
L reveals a Copper, a Fool's Gold and an Advisor.
L discards an Advisor.
L puts a Copper and a Fool's Gold into their hand.
L plays an Advisor.
L shuffles their deck.
L reveals a Copper and 2 Estates.
L discards a Copper.
L puts 2 Estates into their hand.
L plays an Advisor.
L reveals 2 Coppers and an Advisor.
L discards an Advisor.
L puts 2 Coppers into their hand.
L plays 5 Coppers and a Fool's Gold.
L buys and gains a Sir Bailey.
L draws a Copper, an Estate, a Sir Michael and 2 Advisors.

Turn 10 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A summons an Advisor.
A plays an Advisor.
A reveals 2 Fool's Golds and a Gladiator.
A discards a Fool's Gold.
A puts a Fool's Gold and a Gladiator into their hand.
A summons a Gladiator.
A plays a Gladiator.
A reveals a Royal Blacksmith.
A trashes a Gladiator.
A plays a Gladiator.
A reveals a Royal Blacksmith.
A trashes a Gladiator.
A plays a Royal Blacksmith.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws 2 Coppers, an Estate and 2 Fool's Golds.
A reveals a Merchant, 2 Coppers, a Scheme and a Fool's Gold.
A discards 3 Coppers.
A plays 4 Fool's Golds.
A buys a Travelling Fair and a Fortune.
A takes 8 debt.
A gains a Fortune.
A reacts with a Travelling Fair.
A topdecks a Fortune.
A gains 2 Golds.
A repays 8 debt.
A draws 2 Coppers, 2 Fool's Golds and a Fortune.

Turn 11 - Lemira
L plays an Advisor.
L shuffles their deck.
L reveals a Copper and 2 Advisors.
L discards an Advisor.
L puts a Copper and an Advisor into their hand.
L plays an Advisor.
L reveals 2 Coppers and an Estate.
L discards a Copper.
L puts a Copper and an Estate into their hand.
L plays an Advisor.
L reveals a Copper and 2 Advisors.
L discards an Advisor.
L puts a Copper and an Advisor into their hand.
L plays an Advisor.
L reveals a Copper, a Fool's Gold and an Advisor.
L discards an Advisor.
L puts a Copper and a Fool's Gold into their hand.
L plays a Sir Michael.
A discards 2 Coppers.
A reveals a Copper and a Royal Blacksmith.
A discards a Copper and a Royal Blacksmith.
L plays 5 Coppers and a Fool's Gold.
L buys and gains a Dame Anna.
L shuffles their deck.
L draws 2 Coppers, an Estate, a Sir Bailey and an Advisor.

Turn 11 - Awaclus
A plays a Fortune and 2 Fool's Golds.
A buys a Summon.
A gains a Scheme.
A sets a Scheme aside.
A buys a Summon.
A gains a Scheme.
A sets a Scheme aside.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Copper, 3 Fool's Golds and a Royal Blacksmith.

Turn 12 - Lemira
L plays an Advisor.
L reveals a Copper and 2 Advisors.
L discards an Advisor.
L puts a Copper and an Advisor into their hand.
L plays an Advisor.
L reveals an Estate and 2 Advisors.
L discards an Advisor.
L puts an Estate and an Advisor into their hand.
L plays an Advisor.
L reveals a Copper, an Estate and a Dame Anna.
L discards a Dame Anna.
L puts a Copper and an Estate into their hand.
L plays a Sir Bailey.
L draws a Copper.
A reveals a Fool's Gold and an Advisor.
A trashes an Advisor.
A discards a Fool's Gold.
L plays 5 Coppers.
L buys and gains a Wild Hunt.
L draws a Copper, a Fool's Gold, a Sir Michael and 2 Advisors.

Turn 12 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A summons a Scheme.
A plays a Scheme.
A draws an Estate.
A summons a Scheme.
A plays a Scheme.
A draws a Fool's Gold.
A plays a Royal Blacksmith.
A draws 2 Coppers, a Gold, a Gladiator and a Fortune.
A reveals a Merchant, 2 Coppers, a Scheme and a Fool's Gold.
A discards 3 Coppers.
A plays a Gladiator.
A reveals a Fortune.
A plays a Gold, a Fortune and 4 Fool's Golds.
A buys 3 Travelling Fairs and a Royal Blacksmith.
A takes 8 debt.
A gains a Royal Blacksmith.
A reacts with a Travelling Fair.
A topdecks a Royal Blacksmith.
A repays 8 debt.
A buys a Summon.
A gains a Scheme.
A sets a Scheme aside.
A buys a Summon.
A gains a Scheme.
A sets a Scheme aside.
A buys a Summon.
A gains a Scheme.
A sets a Scheme aside.
A buys a Summon.
A gains a Scheme.
A sets a Scheme aside.
A topdecks a Royal Blacksmith.
A draws a Copper, an Estate, a Fool's Gold and 2 Royal Blacksmiths.

Turn 13 - Lemira
L plays an Advisor.
L shuffles their deck.
L reveals a Copper and 2 Advisors.
L discards an Advisor.
L puts a Copper and an Advisor into their hand.
L plays an Advisor.
L reveals an Estate and 2 Advisors.
L discards an Advisor.
L puts an Estate and an Advisor into their hand.
L plays an Advisor.
L reveals 2 Coppers and an Advisor.
L discards an Advisor.
L puts 2 Coppers into their hand.
L plays an Advisor.
L reveals a Copper, an Estate and a Dame Anna.
L discards a Dame Anna.
L puts a Copper and an Estate into their hand.
L plays a Sir Michael.
A discards a Copper and an Estate.
A reveals a Gold and a Fool's Gold.
A trashes a Gold.
A discards a Fool's Gold.
L plays 5 Coppers and a Fool's Gold.
L buys and gains a Gold.
L draws 2 Coppers, an Estate, a Sir Bailey and a Wild Hunt.

Turn 13 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A summons a Scheme.
A plays a Scheme.
A draws a Fool's Gold.
A summons a Scheme.
A plays a Scheme.
A draws a Copper.
A summons a Scheme.
A plays a Scheme.
A draws a Copper.
A summons a Scheme.
A plays a Scheme.
A draws a Royal Blacksmith.
A plays a Royal Blacksmith.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Copper, an Estate, 2 Fool's Golds and a Gladiator.
A reveals a Merchant, 2 Coppers, a Scheme and a Fool's Gold.
A discards 3 Coppers.
A plays a Royal Blacksmith.
A draws a Copper, an Estate, 2 Fool's Golds and a Scheme.
A reveals a Merchant, 2 Coppers, a Scheme and a Fool's Gold.
A discards a Copper.
A plays a Royal Blacksmith.
A draws 3 Coppers, a Gold and a Gladiator.
A reveals a Merchant, 2 Coppers, a Scheme and a Fool's Gold.
A discards 3 Coppers.
A plays a Scheme.
A draws a Fool's Gold.
A plays a Gladiator.
A reveals a Gladiator.
A plays a Gladiator.
A reveals a Gold.
A plays a Gold and 7 Fool's Golds.
A buys 4 Travelling Fairs and a Summon.
A gains a Merchant.
A sets a Merchant aside.
A buys a Summon.
A gains a Merchant.
A sets a Merchant aside.
A buys a Summon.
A gains a Merchant.
A sets a Merchant aside.
A buys a Summon.
A gains a Merchant.
A sets a Merchant aside.
A buys a Summon.
A gains a Merchant.
A sets a Merchant aside.
A topdecks 2 Schemes and 3 Royal Blacksmiths.
A draws 2 Schemes and 3 Royal Blacksmiths.

Turn 14 - Lemira
L plays a Sir Bailey.
L shuffles their deck.
L draws a Gold.
A reveals a Fool's Gold and a Fortune.
A discards a Fool's Gold and a Fortune.
L plays a Wild Hunt.
L draws a Copper, a Dame Anna and an Advisor.
L plays 3 Coppers and a Gold.
L buys and gains a Gold.
L draws a Copper, an Estate, a Fool's Gold, a Sir Michael and an Advisor.

Turn 14 - Awaclus
A starts their turn.
A summons a Merchant.
A plays a Merchant.
A draws an Estate.
A summons a Merchant.
A plays a Merchant.
A draws a Scheme.
A summons a Merchant.
A plays a Merchant.
A draws a Fool's Gold.
A summons a Merchant.
A plays a Merchant.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws a Fool's Gold.
A summons a Merchant.
A plays a Merchant.
A draws a Scheme.
A plays a Scheme.
A draws a Gladiator.
A plays a Royal Blacksmith.
A draws 2 Coppers, an Estate, a Fool's Gold and a Scheme.
A reveals a Merchant, 2 Coppers, a Scheme and a Fool's Gold.
A discards 2 Coppers.
A plays a Royal Blacksmith.
A draws 3 Coppers, a Gold and an Estate.
A reveals a Merchant, 2 Coppers, a Scheme and a Fool's Gold.
A discards 3 Coppers.
A plays a Royal Blacksmith.
A draws a Copper, 3 Fool's Golds and a Fortune.
A reveals a Merchant, 2 Coppers, a Scheme and a Fool's Gold.
A discards a Copper.
A plays a Scheme.
A draws a Fool's Gold.
A plays a Scheme.
A draws a Fool's Gold.
A plays a Scheme.
A draws a Scheme.
A plays a Scheme.
A draws a Gladiator.
A plays a Scheme.
A draws a Copper.
A plays a Gladiator.
A reveals a Fortune.
A plays a Gladiator.
A reveals a Fortune.
A plays a Copper, a Gold, a Fortune and 8 Fool's Golds.
A buys 8 Travelling Fairs and a Scheme.
A gains a Scheme.
A buys and gains a Province, 3 Schemes and 2 Advisors.
A shuffles their deck.
A draws 2 Coppers, a Merchant, a Fool's Gold and a Scheme.

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